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Can you challenge radar gun results?

On Behalf of | Mar 11, 2019 | Traffic Offenses Blog Post |

So there you were, driving down the road when the flashing lights of a police car were reflecting in your rearview mirror. The police officer says that his radar gun registered that you were driving over the speed limit and that you are now getting a speeding ticket. You were sure that you were driving under the speed limit and wonder how the radar gun got the result wrong.

While many people think that radar guns are infallible, they are only as good as the person who maintains and uses them. Radar guns operators can make mistakes and technology can break. Learn how radar gun results can be inaccurate and how you can use this knowledge to defend yourself.

How can radar guns give inaccurate results?

There are many ways that a radar gun can give inaccurate results. In this blog post, we will focus on calibration and training.

Radar guns use radio signals and the Doppler effect to calculate the speed of a moving vehicle. Because radar guns are sophisticated tools, they require constant recalibration. If police officers do not regularly maintain radar guns, they can give inaccurate results. Law enforcement agencies must keep records of when they calibrate their radar guns and test them to make sure that they work correctly.

Police officers that use radar guns must have the proper training to ensure that they can use the gun correctly. If an officer misuses a radar gun, the gun may give the user inaccurate results. Law enforcement agencies should keep records of which officers have a license or training to use a radar gun.

Challenging radar gun evidence

If you believe that the radar gun results in your criminal traffic case are inaccurate, it is essential that you contact a knowledgeable defense attorney. A skilled lawyer can investigate who used the radar gun in your case and when the gun was last calibrated. With this knowledge, the attorney can then build a defense that shows how the radar gun results are inaccurate and protect your rights.

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